The unique WDPS Life Skills Challenge program has been created because all children need a key skills-set in order to develop their potential and to make their life dreams become a reality.
All visitors help us to become enquirers and to learn and discover new things about the world.
Visiting 10 Downing Street helps us appreciate that the WDPS Core Values are reflected in fundamental ‘British Values.’
WDPS Cycle offsite multi-day challenges help us all to develop resilience and to become effective team players.
We develop higher-level thinking skills online by learning to analyse, synthesise and evaluate.
Our teachers appreciate that we are all unique individuals with different learning styles.
Learning is fun as our Teachers plan exciting learning experiences through the International Primary Curriculum (IPC).
The all–weather WDPS Mountain Bike and Running Trail helps us develop fitness, stamina and essential bike-handling skills.
We learn from different world cultures which helps shape us into well-balanced and open-minded global citizens.
In the WDPS Bushcraft Area we develop our Multiple Intelligences and self-confidence whilst learning to manage risks.
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English Curriculum.

Literacy skills are essential to thinking and learning. Language is a natural instrument for the expression of our experiences – both for the products of the imagination and intellect. Our children have to live and function in a literate society. WDPS provides the children with the basic skills to access our world and to reach their full potential.
At WDPS every effort is made to encourage children to develop a love of language, reading and creating through literacy. WDPS has high expectations which develop the children’s ability to speak and listen for difference purposes and also develop phonological awareness and reading skills. We provide a high quality writing curriculum which equips our pupils with a strong command of the written language.
At WDPS, through literacy across the curriculum, the children develop the WDPS Core Values (comprising of ‘Attitudes to Promote’ and ‘Learner Profile’) of: Creativity, Enthusiasm, Cooperation, Thinkers, Enquirers, Risk Takers, Knowledgeable, Open mindedness, Communicators, Reflective, Curiosity, Independence, Commitment, Confidence and Adaptability.
Each week the children take part in a whole school Resilience Programme where the children apply a wide range of literacy skills from speaking and listening (When children explore and describe feeling) to articulating viewpoints and to being active listeners and communicators.
The International Primary Curriculum (IPC)  is a vehicle used to teach literacy.  Valuable cross curricular links are made and one literacy block per half term is linked to each Phase’s IPC unit of work. 
Below is a comprehensive overview of what the children are taught at WDPS through the English curriculum.

Phase 1 (Year 1 and 2)

Children will be taught to:

Speaking and listening

  • Listen and respond appropriately to adults and their peers
  • Ask relevant questions to extend their understanding and knowledge
  • Use relevant strategies to build their vocabulary
  • Begin to give reasons for their answers and express their opinions
  • To begin to describe things including feelings
  • Begin to give simple explanations
  • Be active listeners and respond to others’ contributions
  • Use talk partners to explore ideas and make predictions
  • Participate in discussions performances and role play

Reading

  • apply phonic knowledge and skills as the route to decode words ( Year 2 - until automatic decoding has become embedded and reading is fluent)
  • respond speedily with the correct sound to graphemes (letters or groups of letters) for all 40+ phonemes, including, where applicable, alternative sounds for graphemes
  • read accurately by blending sounds in unfamiliar words containing GPCs (grapheme, phoneme correspondences) that have been taught
  • read words containing common suffixes
  • read common exception words, noting unusual correspondences between spelling and sound and where these occur in the word
  • read most words quickly and accurately, without overt sounding and blending, when they have been frequently encountered
  • read accurately words of two or more syllables that contain the same graphemes as above
  • read words containing taught GPCs and –s, –es, –ing, –ed, –er and –est endings
  • read other words of more than one syllable that contain taught GPCs
  • read words with contractions [for example, I’m, I’ll, we’ll], and understand that the apostrophe represents the omitted letter(s)
  • read aloud accurately books that are consistent with their developing phonic knowledge and that do not require them to use other strategies to work out words
  • re-read these books to build up their fluency and confidence in word reading.

Comprehension

Year 1

  • develop pleasure in reading, motivation to read, vocabulary and understanding by:
  • listening to and discussing a wide range of poems, stories and non-fiction at a level beyond that at which they can read independently
  • being encouraged to link what they read or hear read to their own experiences
  • becoming very familiar with key stories, fairy stories and traditional tales, retelling them and considering their particular characteristics
  • recognising and joining in with predictable phrases
  • learning to appreciate rhymes and poems, and to recite some by heart
  • discussing word meanings, linking new meanings to those already known
  • Understand both the books they can already read accurately and fluently and those they listen to by:
  • drawing on what they already know or on background information and vocabulary provided by the teacher
  • checking that the text makes sense to them as they read and correcting inaccurate reading
  • discussing the significance of the title and events
  • making inferences on the basis of what is being said and done
  • predicting what might happen on the basis of what has been read so far
  • participate in discussion about what is read to them, taking turns and listening to what others say.
  • explain clearly their understanding of what is read to them.

Year 2

  • develop pleasure in reading, motivation to read, vocabulary and understanding by:
  • listening to, discussing and expressing views about a wide range of contemporary and classic poetry, stories and non-fiction at a level beyond that at which they can read independently
  • discussing the sequence of events in books and how items of information are related
  • becoming increasingly familiar with and retelling a wider range of stories, fairy stories and traditional tales
  • being introduced to non-fiction books that are structured in different ways
  • recognising simple recurring literary language in stories and poetry
  • discussing and clarifying the meanings of words, linking new meanings to known vocabulary
  • discussing their favourite words and phrases
  • continuing to build up a repertoire of poems learnt by heart, appreciating these and reciting some, with appropriate intonation to make the meaning clear
  • understand both the books that they can already read accurately and fluently and those that they listen to by:
  • drawing on what they already know or on background information and vocabulary provided by the teacher
  • checking that the text makes sense to them as they read and correcting inaccurate reading
  • making inferences on the basis of what is being said and done
  • answering and asking questions
  • predicting what might happen on the basis of what has been read so far
  • participate in discussion about books, poems and other works that are read to them and those that they can read for themselves, taking turns and listening to what others say
  • explain and discuss their understanding of books, poems and other material, both those that they listen to and those that they read for themselves.

Handwriting

  • Children to be able to form all letters of the alphabet correctly including capital letters and numbers.
  • Letters have clear shape and orientation. Work can be read unassisted
  • All letters correctly formed and beginning to join simple letter sets
  • All letters correct size and orientation
  • A fluent and legible style

Spelling

  • Spell phonically plausible words using the 40+ phonemes from letters and sounds
  • See year 1 spelling list
  • Read and spell all Year 2 High Frequency Words
  • Spell and use rules in Year 2 spelling appendix

Composition

  • Discuss what they have written
  • Children to be able to write a basic story which includes a clear beginning, middle and end
  • Children to be able to write 10+ sentences consistently
  • Children able to make connections within their sentences using connectives such as and, then, next, with
  • Children to use adventurous/topic specific words
  • Write for a sustained period
  • Organise writing into simple paragraphs ( minimum of 3)
  • Proof read and edit own work to improve it
  • Use a wider variety of openers
  • Use both simple and compound sentence structures
  • Use time phrases to sequence writing
  • Vivid and adventurous description to interest the reader
  • Write stories and non- fiction texts that are interesting for the reader

Grammar and punctuation

  • Punctuate a sentence using a capital letter, full stops and finger spaces in their writing
  • Children understand what a question/exclamation mark is used for and may use them in their writing.
  • Capital letters are used at the beginning of a piece of writing and when writing their own name, others names, days of the week and for the pronoun ‘I’.
  • Use and to join two sentences
  • Sequence sentences to form short narratives

Terminology
Letter, capital letter, word, singular, plural, punctuation, full stop, exclamation mark, question mark

  • Use capital letters and full stops accurately in own writing
  • Begin to use exclamation marks, question marks and inverted commas for speech
  • Use comma to separate items in a list
  • Use the correct tense appropriately
  • Use apostrophes for contractions and single possession (Sam’s pen)
  • Start sentences with adverbs
  • Use because, while, however to link ideas
  • Be able to recognise and use a statement, command, question and exclamation

Terminology
Noun, noun phrase, statement, exclamation, question, command, compound suffix, adjective, adverb, verb, tense (past-present) apostrophe, comma.

Key One Spelling appendix

Phase 2 (Year 3 and 4)

Children will be taught to:

Speaking and listening

  • Listen and respond appropriately to adults and their peers
  • Ask relevant questions to extend their understanding and knowledge
  • Use relevant strategies to build their vocabulary
  • Give reasons for their answers, arguments  and express their opinions
  • Describe things with more detail including feelings
  • Begin to give simple explanations
  • Be active listeners and respond to others’ contributions and collaborate
  • Use talk partners to explore ideas and make predictions
  • Speak clearly and fluently
  • Participate in discussions, presentations,  performances and role play
  • Engage other listeners and interpret their responses
  • Use different tones of voice depending on the audience

Reading

  • apply their growing knowledge of root words, prefixes and suffixes (etymology and morphology), both to read aloud and to understand the meaning of new words they meet
  • read further exception words, noting the unusual correspondences between spelling and sound, and where these occur in the word.

Comprehension

  • develop positive attitudes to reading and understanding of what they read by:
  • listening to and discussing a wide range of fiction, poetry, plays, non-fiction and reference books or textbooks
  • reading books that are structured in different ways and reading for a range of purposes
  • using dictionaries to check the meaning of words that they have read
  • increasing their familiarity with a wide range of books, including fairy stories, myths and legends, and retelling some of these orally
  • identifying themes and conventions in a wide range of books
  • preparing poems and play scripts to read aloud and to perform, showing understanding through intonation, tone, volume and action
  • discussing words and phrases that capture the reader’s interest and imagination
  • recognising some different forms of poetry [for example, free verse, narrative poetry]
  • understand what they read, in books they can read independently, by:
  • checking that the text makes sense to them, discussing their understanding and explaining the meaning of words in context
  • asking questions to improve their understanding of a text
  • drawing inferences such as inferring characters’ feelings, thoughts and motives from their actions, and justifying inferences with evidence
  • predicting what might happen from details stated and implied
  • identifying main ideas drawn from more than one paragraph and summarising these
  • identifying how language, structure, and presentation contribute to meaning
  • retrieve and record information from non-fiction.
  • participate in discussion about both books that are read to them and those they can read for themselves, taking turns and listening to what others say.

Handwriting

  • Use strokes that are needed to join letters
  • Increase the consistency and quality of handwriting
  • Use fluent, joined handwriting consistently

Spelling

  • Spell and use rules in Year 3 spelling appendix
  • Spell words from the Year 3 word list correctly and use them consistently in their writing.
  • Use the possessive apostrophe
  • Use a dictionary to check spellings (using first 2 -3 letters)
  • Spell and use rules in Year 4 spelling appendix
  • Spell words from the Year 4 word list correctly and use them consistently in their writing

Composition

  • Use some sentence variations in their writing
  • Using compound and complex sentences – use because (begin to use if,  when, although)
  • Beginning to use paragraphs/ section their ideas
  • Create settings, characters and plot in narratives - comment on the characters thoughts and feelings.
  • Use simple organisational features in non – narrative writing
  • To be able to write for a sustained period of time.
  • Awareness of time for each story part (don’t rush the ending)
  • Use some sentence variations in their writing
  • Narrative writing includes a problem and resolution while sequencing their ideas.

 
Vocabulary Grammar and Punctuation

  • Use full stops, capital letters, exclamation marks and question marks. Mostly accurate use of commas used in lists; and commas (comma splicing evident) accurately.
  • Some use of inverted commas.
  • Use and punctuate direct speech accurately
  • Begin to use other punctuation when reporting speech
  • A concise piece of writing with correct punctuation, grammar and spelling.
  • Use the correct determiner for a noun
  • Use a range of prefixes (super- anti- auto)
  • Expressing time, place and cause using conjunctions (when-before-after-while-so-because-then-next-soon-therefore-before-after-during-in-because of)
  • Use paragraphs and sub headings.
  • Use paragraphs organised around a theme
  • Use simple, compound and complex sentences with some subordinate connectives eg also, as well, but
  • Use present perfect form of verbs in contrast to the past tense
  • To know the difference between the possessive s and plural s
  • Use powerful verbs and adverbs for effect.
  • Use technical/subject-specific vocabulary
  • Use expanded noun phrases with modifying adjectives.
  • Use frontal adverbials and use a comma after them
  • Appropriate use of nouns and pronouns throughout a piece of work

Terminology
Preposition, conjunction, word family, prefix, clause subordinate clause, direct speech, consonant, consonant letter vowel, vowel, vowel letter, inverted commas, speech marks. Determiner, pronoun, possessive pronoun and adverbial

Phase Three (Year 5 and 6)

Children will be taught to:

Speaking and Listening

  • Listen and respond appropriately to adults and their peers
  • Ask relevant questions to extend their understanding and knowledge
  • Use a wider range of vocabulary when speaking
  • Confidently articulate  answers, arguments  and express their opinions
  • Give well-structured descriptions, explanations and narratives for different purposes including feelings
  • Be active listeners and respond to others’ contributions and collaborate staying on topic
  • Use spoken language to develop understanding through speculating, hypothesising, imagining and exploring ideas
  • Speak clearly and fluently with a command of Standard English
  • Participate in discussions, presentations, performances, improvisations, role play and debate.
  • Engage other listener/s and interpret their responses
  • Consider and evaluate different viewpoints, taking account of previous contributions
  • Use different tones of voice depending on the audience

Reading

Apply their growing knowledge of root words, prefixes and suffixes (morphology and etymology), both to read aloud and to understand the meaning of new words that they meet.

Comprehension

  • maintain positive attitudes to reading and understanding of what they read by:
  • continuing to read and discuss an increasingly wide range of fiction, poetry, plays, non-fiction and reference books or textbooks
  • reading books that are structured in different ways and reading for a range of purposes
  • increasing their familiarity with a wide range of books, including myths, legends and traditional stories, modern fiction, fiction from our literary heritage, and books from other cultures and traditions
  • recommending books that they have read to their peers, giving reasons for their choices
  • identifying and discussing themes and conventions in and across a wide range of writing
  • making comparisons within and across books
  • learning a wider range of poetry by heart
  • preparing poems and plays to read aloud and to perform, showing understanding through intonation, tone and volume so that the meaning is clear to an audience
  • understand what they read by:
  • checking that the book makes sense to them, discussing their understanding and exploring the meaning of words in context
  • asking questions to improve their understanding
  • drawing inferences such as inferring characters’ feelings, thoughts and motives from their actions, and justifying inferences with evidence
  • predicting what might happen from details stated and implied
  • summarising the main ideas drawn from more than one paragraph, identifying key details that support the main ideas
  • identifying how language, structure and presentation contribute to meaning
  • discuss and evaluate how authors use language, including figurative language, considering the impact on the reader
  • distinguish between statements of fact and opinion
  • retrieve, record and present information from non-fiction
  • participate in discussions about books that are read to them and those they can read for themselves, building on their own and others’ ideas and challenging views courteously
  • explain and discuss their understanding of what they have read, including through formal presentations and debates, maintaining a focus on the topic and using notes where necessary
  • provide reasoned justifications for their views.

Handwriting

  • Use  a legible, fluent  style with increasing speed
  • Use the appropriate standard and style for particular tasks, eg note taking or final draft
  • Joined handwriting resulting in sustained periods of writing  ( side of quality A4)

Spelling

  • Spell and use rules in Year 5 spelling appendix
  • Spell words from the Year 5 word list correctly and use them consistently in their writing. 
  • Use dictionaries to check spelling and meaning of words
  • Use a thesaurus
  • Spell and use rules in Year 6 spelling appendix
  • Spell words from the Year 6 word list correctly and use them consistently in their writing. 
  • Apply their knowledge of morphology and etymology to spell correctly

Composition

  • Plan / draft/ evaluate and edit writing
  • Show some awareness of audience and purpose through selection of relevant content and an attempt to interest the reader.
  • Features of writing generally appropriate to the selected task, e.g. use of dialogue in a story; use of first person for a letter; use of imperative in instructions.
  • Viewpoint (opinion, attitude, position) is expressed, but may not be maintained.
  • Some detail / description of events or ideas expanded through vocabulary (simple adverbs, adjectives) or explanation. Some vocabulary selected for effect or appropriateness to task.
  • To write with a sustained speed and enthusiasm
  • Develop a writer’s voice and show viewpoint where relevant
  • Write for a clear purpose and be able to adapt style to a range of forms
  • Consistently structure writing in paragraphs or sections using linking connectives between and within sections to support overall composition
  • Use vocabulary, grammar and punctuation to enhance effects and clarify meaning
  • Varied use of sentence openers, avoiding repetition

Vocabulary, Grammar and Punctuation

  • Use of commas to separate clauses.
  • Punctuate bullet points consistently
  • Use expanded noun phrases to convey meaning concisely
  • Use modal verbs and adverbs
  • Some use of sentence variation e.g. dialogue, action, description (particularly in narrative)
  • To include new vocabulary, gained from reading and teacher talk, in a variety of contexts.
  • Convert nouns and adjectives into verbs using suffixes as well as verb prefixes
  • Use relative clauses beginning with who, what, where, which, when, whose or that
  • Use adverbs to express degrees of possibility (perhaps – surely)
  • Link paragraphs using adverbials and passing of time
  • Use brackets, dashes and comma to indicate parenthesis
  • Apply formal and informal language appropriately
  • Understand how words are related for example synonyms and antonyms
  • Use the passive voice for effect and appropriately
  • Correct use of ellipsis, apostrophes, hyphens, brackets, semi colons, colons and dashes
  • Choosing varied and accurate vocabulary for effect and emphasis

Terminology
Modal verb, relative pronoun, relative clause, parenthesis, cohesion, ambiguity, bracket and dash, subject, object, active, passive, synonym, antonym, ellipsis, hyphen colon, semi-colon and bullet point

Key Stage 2 Spelling appendix

For children over the age of five, WDPS ensures it covers the statutory knowledge, skills and understanding from the English National Curriculum which is made up of these subjects:

PSHE with Citizenship Design Technology Art & Design Geography History RE Music PE Science Computing English Mathematics Modern Foreign Languages Early Years Curriculum International Primary Curriculum